Challah

Happy (??) internet blackout day type thing! If you need any info on SOPA and why it’s bad, Nedroid has my favorite post about it.

Aaaanyways, on to food! If you’re a fan of french toast, knowing how to make good challah to turn into french toast is a really useful skill. This challah recipe is great, and makes a mighty fine french toast!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 packages active dry yeast (1 1/2 tablespoons)
  • 1 3/4 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil, plus more for greasing the bowl
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon table salt
  • 8 to 8 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and the tablespoon of sugar in the water and let it sit five or ten minutes until starting to get foamy.

Whisk in the oil, then beat the eggs in one at a time. Whisk in the sugar and salt.

Add the 8 cups of flour a cup or so at a time while stirring. Keep stirring until the dough holds together.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth.

Clean out the bowl, grease it, and place the dough in it, rotating to grease the top too. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft free place for one hour until almost doubled in size. Punch the dough down, cover it back up, and let rise again for another half hour.

Divide the dough in half, then divide each half into three. Roll each piece into a rope. I made mine pretty long and thin, about 20″.  I think I might do a slightly stumpier one in the future. Braid your six ropes into two braids. If you want to make a 6 strand braid, you can check out directions at smittenkitchen.

Carefully move your braids to parchment lined baking sheets. Beat the remaining egg and brush it over the loaves, saving any leftover egg.

If you want to freeze one of the loaves, you can do it now, then give it 5 hours to thaw later on a counter. Otherwise, let it rise for one last hour. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Before putting in the oven, brush  second time with egg.

Bake for 30-40 minutes, until it’s reached a nice deep golden brown. Cool on a wire rack.

Thinly sliced, this makes good sandwiches and happy coworkers.

More thickly sliced and you’ll get some fantabulous french toast!

Challah

Adapted from smittenkitchen.

  • 1 1/2 packages active dry yeast (1 1/2 tablespoons)
  • 1 3/4 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil, plus more for greasing the bowl
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon table salt
  • 8 to 8 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast and the tablespoon of sugar in the water and let it sit five or ten minutes until starting to get foamy.

Whisk in the oil, then beat the eggs in one at a time. Whisk in the sugar and salt. Gradually add the 8 cups of flour, stirring until the dough holds together. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth.

Clean out the bowl, grease it, and place the dough in it, rotating to grease the top too. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft free place for one hour until almost doubled in size. Punch the dough down, re-cover it, and let rise again for another half hour.

Divide the dough in half, then divide each half into three. Roll each piece into a rope 15-20″ long. Braid into two braids.

Carefully move your braids to parchment lined baking sheets. Beat the remaining egg and brush it over the loaves, saving any leftover egg.

Let rise for one hour. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Brush loaves with egg a second time.

Bake for 30-40 minutes, until it’s reached a nice deep golden brown. Cool on a wire rack.

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About sparecake

My name's Corinne, and I like cake, cookies, and chocolate! Also, non-c-things such as ponies, Star Trek, and biking. I write a food blog and a blog about life, wide open spaces, and museum work. Nice to meet you!
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