Apple Cider Punch

In the 7 1/2 years I’ve done this blog, I’d apparently only shared one drink. Let’s bring it up to 2!

I was recently contacted by Moscow Muled, a company that makes copper mugs. They’re hoping that people can realize that not only are copper mugs good for Moscow mules (…I don’t drink, someone had to tell me what those even are), but they’re good for other drinks as well, and they sent me two mugs to help that cause. I originally thought I’d make a warm cider drink, but since I’d been told that the ginger beer in a Moscow mule, as it passes the copper rim of the mug, has an exciting zip to it (plus it was 88 degrees, IN OCTOBER), I went for a chilled, ginger beer-containing drink instead!

This one’s simple, with just bowl, and barely 2 steps. It’s very fall-y, but definitely not in a mulled cider way. The copper mugs from Moscow Muled look nice, stay chilled, and are a good shape to hold, so if you’re into Moscow mules, or just want some nice looking mugs on hooks in your kitchen, these are a very solid choice!

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups apple cider
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 2 12 ounce bottles ginger beer
  • 1 apple, sliced
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • ice
  • rum (optional)

Combine the apple cider and orange juice in a pitcher or large bowl. Add the ginger beer and sliced fruit when ready to serve, and serve with ice. Add rum to taste, if desired.

This is actually a half recipe – gotta buy myself a nice looking pitcher next!

Apple Cider Punch

From My Heart Beets.

  • 8 cups apple cider
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 2 12 ounce bottles ginger beer
  • 1 apple, sliced
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • ice
  • rum (optional)

Combine the apple cider and orange juice in a pitcher or large bowl. Add the ginger beer and sliced fruit when ready to serve, and serve with ice. Add rum to taste, if desired.

 

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Rye Raisin Bread

A flavorful bread, the raisins are sweet but the molasses in the dough just adds flavor, not additional sweetness. It was nice!

Ingredients:

Sponge:

  • 2 cups rye flour
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water (120-130 degrees)

Dough:

  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup light (sultana) raisins
  • 1/2 cup water or brandy
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup warm water (105-115 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 cups rye flour
  • 1 1/2 cups bread or all-purpose flour (I used bread flour)
  • 1 egg + 1 teaspoon milk beaten together for egg wash

In a large bowl, combine the flour and yeast for the sponge, then pour in the hot water and stir until evenly mixed. Cover and let sit at room temperature until bubbly, at least 2-3 hours, or up to 3 days for a stronger rye flavor.

Towards the end of that time, combine the raisins and 1/2 cup water or brandy for 1/2 an hour, then drain, toss the liquid into the sponge, and pat the raisins dry.

In a small bowl, stir together the molasses, oil, salt, and warm water.

Add to the sponge, then add the raisins as well, and stir to combine. Add the rye and bread flours, alternating half cups, and stir with a wooden spoon, then by hand, adding additional flour if the mixture is still quite sticky.

Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Place the kneaded dough in a large bowl and grease the surface. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Punch down the risen dough and divide into 2 pieces.

Let rest 5 minutes, then shape into round loaves, slightly flattened, and place the loaves on a greased on lined baking sheet. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees.

After rising, brush the surface of both loaves with the egg wash.

Bake 1 hour, or until well browned and crusty, and tapping the bottom gives a hollow sound.

Rye Raisin Bread

From Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads (which gives more options for how to put the dough together, if you’re into using a mixer or a food processor).

Sponge:

  • 2 cups rye flour
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water (120-130 degrees)

Dough:

  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup light (sultana) raisins
  • 1/2 cup water or brandy
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup warm water (105-115 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 cups rye flour
  • 1 1/2 cups bread or all-purpose flour (I used bread flour)
  • 1 egg + 1 teaspoon milk beaten together for egg wash

In a large bowl, combine the flour and yeast for the sponge, then pour in the hot water and stir until evenly mixed. Cover and let sit at room temperature until bubbly, at least 2-3 hours, or up to 3 days for a stronger rye flavor. Towards the end of that time, combine the raisins and 1/2 cup water or brandy for 1/2 an hour, then drain, toss the liquid into the sponge, and pat the raisins dry.

In a small bowl, stir together the molasses, oil, salt, and warm water. Add to the sponge, then add the raisins as well, and stir to combine. Add the rye and bread flours, alternating half cups, and stir with a wooden spoon, then by hand, adding additional flour if the mixture is still quite sticky. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Place the kneaded dough in a large bowl and grease the surface. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Punch down the risen dough and divide into 2 pieces. Let rest 5 minutes, then shape into round loaves, slightly flattened, and place the loaves on a greased on lined baking sheet. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees.

After rising, brush the surface of both loaves with the egg wash. Bake 1 hour, or until well browned and crusty, and tapping the bottom gives a hollow sound.

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Berry Spelt Scones

So, this is going to be an unusual start, but I want to first recommend a different scone recipe. I made 8 batches of this cheddar and chive scone recipe at work, and didn’t get any pictures, but they are still being talked about a month later. So, make those, and then once you’re done with savory, come back and make these!

This scone recipe tastes strongly like toast (which is a huge plus to me!), and then has berries, so there’s a bit of a toast and jelly thing going on. I used blueberries, but I think raspberries would also be really great as well.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups spelt flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1/2 cup frozen butter
  • 1 cup blueberries (or raspberries)
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk, plus more for brushing

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet and set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda, cinnamon, and sugar.

Use a cheese grater to grate the frozen butter into the dry goods, stopping every so often to stir the grated butter into the dry goods so that it doesn’t clump back up.

Stir in to resemble coarse crumbs, then add the blueberries and stir again to distribute evenly.

Add the buttermilk and mix until just combined. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 5 or 6 times, then divide into 2 portions. Shape each half into a ball, then flatten to a disk approximately 1 1/2″ thick. Cut each disk into 4 wedges, and place on the lined sheet.

Brush the top with buttermilk, then sprinkle with additional sugar.

Bake 25 minutes, or until well browned, with berry juice bubbling through the surface.

Best eaten the same day, or re-toasted.

Berry Spelt Scones

Slightly adapted from AllRecipes.

  • 2 cups spelt flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1/2 cup frozen butter
  • 1 cup blueberries (or raspberries)
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk, plus more for brushing

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet and set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda, cinnamon, and sugar. Use a cheese grater to grate the frozen butter into the dry goods, stopping every so often to stir the grated butter into the dry goods so that it doesn’t clump back up. Stir in to resemble coarse crumbs, then add the blueberries and stir again to distribute evenly. Add the buttermilk and mix until just combined.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead 5 or 6 times, then divide into 2 portions. Shape each half into a ball, then flatten to a disk approximately 1 1/2″ thick. Cut each disk into 4 wedges, and place on the lined sheet. Brush the top with buttermilk, then sprinkle with additional sugar.

Bake 25 minutes, or until well browned, with berry juice bubbling through the surface. Best eaten the same day, or re-toasted.

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Olive Oil Cake

This is not the first olive oil baked good on this blog, but it is probably the one where the flavor comes through most strongly. Luckily it meshes well with the rosemary and chocolate it’s paired with, and the spelt flour helps create a very nice texture.

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup spelt flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 5 ounces bittersweet chocolate, cut into roughly 1/2″ pieces

I didn’t have chocolate bars, but did a rough chop of some Ghirardelli chips

Grease a 9 1/2″ fluted tart pan with olive oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, sift together the flours, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Dump in any larger bits that don’t go through the sifter.

In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, then whisk in the olive oil, milk, and rosemary.

Gently fold the egg mixture into the dry mixture with a rubber spatula, stirring until just combined.

Add the chocolate and stir in.

Gently transfer to the greased pan and smooth the top.

I wasn’t sure about trusting my tart pan, so wrapped it in foil, and then when I saw how close to the top this pan was filled I put it on a sheet pan in case there was any overflow, but in both cases I worried for naught, everything stayed where it belonged.

Bake for 40 minutes on the middle rack, until golden brown and darker on the edges.

Eat warm from the pan, or cool and wrap tightly in plastic to store.

Olive Oil Cake

From Good to the Grain by Kim Boyce.

 

  • 3/4 cup spelt flour
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 3/4 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 5 ounces bittersweet chocolate, cut into roughly 1/2″ pieces

Grease a 9 1/2″ fluted tart pan with olive oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, sift together the flours, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Dump in any larger bits that don’t go through the sifter.

In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, then whisk in the olive oil, milk, and rosemary.

Gently fold the egg mixture into the dry mixture with a rubber spatula, stirring until just combined. Add the chocolate and stir in. Gently transfer to the greased pan and smooth the top.

Bake for 40 minutes on the middle rack, until golden brown and darker on the edges. Eat warm from the pan, or cool and wrap tightly in plastic to store.

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Rye Crumble Bars

There’s a metropark near me with a historic, water-powered mill. Eventually once my work is growing crops, they’ll be able to mill them for us (VERY COOL), but in the meantime, they’re already doin’ their thing with grains from elsewhere. A few weeks ago, I was given both rye and spelt flours ground at the mill, so there’ll be a bunch of rye and spelt recipes going on for the next few weeks! I’d never baked with either, and was not in love with some of the descriptions I read online (“nutty flavor” no thx) but I’ve enjoyed the results so far! Spelt scones taste like toast! And these crumble bars are delightful – although there was a somewhat bitter smell while they baked, there was no bitterness in the final flavor, and the rye flavor went super well with the sweetness from the jam. As this bakes, the jam caramelizes slightly, and the thickened gummy bits at the edges made me quite happy. I’d happily eat these again, if I didn’t have other plans for the rest of the rye flour!

Ingredients:

Shortbread Crust:

  • 1/2 cup dark rye flour (honestly I’m not sure if what I have is dark or light or somewhere in the middle, but it works)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Crumble:

  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons dark rye flour
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly

 

  • 1 1/2 cups jam, preserves, or fruit butter (I used strawberry jam, and recommend it!)

rye flour!

Grease a 9″ springform pan and set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the flours, sugar, and salt and whisk together.

Add the butter and vanilla and stir until well combined – using your hands if needed to completely combine.

Pour the mixture into the greased springform and press firmly to evenly cover the bottom of the pan. Place the pan in the freezer for 30 minutes, or longer if you want to make ahead.

While the crust chills, preheat your oven to 275 degrees. Bake 50-55 minutes, until pale brown. Remove the cooked crust from the oven and increase the temperature to 350 degrees.

While the crust cooks, make the crumble. Combine the oats, sugars, flours, and salt in a food processor and process until the oats are partially ground, about 10 seconds.

Pour the mixture out into a bowl and stir in the butter, squeezing to create clumps of various sizes.

When the crust has baked and the crumble is prepared, briefly stir the jam to break it up, then spread it over the crust.

Evenly sprinkle the crumble over the jam, squeezing again to create various sized clumps. It will seem like it might be too much crumble, like you’re burying the jam entirely, but it tastes good in the end.

Bake 50-55 minutes, rotating halfway through.

Remove from the oven and let cool about 45 minutes, until it’s cool enough to handle but still warm, and run a knife around the inside edge of the pan. Remove the walls of the pan, and let cool further still on the bottom of the pan before cutting into wedges.

Thanks to Hillary, who recommended this recipe. See you in a few weeks, Hillary!

Rye Crumble Bars

From Orangette.

Shortbread Crust:

  • 1/2 cup dark rye flour (honestly I’m not sure if what I have is dark or light or somewhere in the middle, but it works)
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Crumble:

  • 1 cup rolled oats
  • 3 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons dark rye flour
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly

 

  • 1 1/2 cups jam, preserves, or fruit butter (I used strawberry jam, and recommend it!)

Grease a 9″ springform pan and set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the flours, sugar, and salt and whisk together. Add the butter and vanilla and stir until well combined – using your hands if needed to completely combine. Pour the mixture into the greased springform and press firmly to evenly cover the bottom of the pan. Place the pan in the freezer for 30 minutes, or longer if you want to make ahead.

While the crust chills, preheat your oven to 275 degrees. Bake 50-55 minutes, until pale brown. Remove the cooked crust from the oven and increase the temperature to 350 degrees.

While the crust cooks, make the crumble. Combine the oats, sugars, flours, and salt in a food processor and process until the oats are partially ground, about 10 seconds. Pour the mixture out into a bowl and stir in the butter, squeezing to create clumps of various sizes.

When the crust has baked and the crumble is prepared, briefly stir the jam to break it up, then spread it over the crust. Evenly sprinkle the crumble over the jam, squeezing again to create various sized clumps.

Bake 50-55 minutes, rotating halfway through. Remove from the oven and let cool about 45 minutes, until it’s cool enough to handle but still warm, and run a knife around the inside edge of the pan. Remove the walls of the pan, and let cool further still on the bottom of the pan before cutting into wedges.

Posted in Dessert | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Caramel Apple Bread

This recipe took a bit of changing, but it was SO WORTH IT. It’s magically delicious inside, and wonderfully crunchy outside. Very glad I gave this one another try!

Ingredients:

 

  • 1 1/2 cups apple, chopped small
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 1/4 cupsĀ bread flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour or white whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups cool water
  • 3/4 cup salted caramel chips

The night before (or early morning, depending on how you want to time this), preheat your oven to 425 degrees while you cut your apple. Small pieces will bake more, drying out somewhat, which is what you’re going for to reduce the amount of liquid that the apple will later put into the dough.

Combine the cinnamon and sugar in a small bowl, then toss the apples in the mixture. Grease a baking sheet and spread the cinnamon sugar apple pieces on it. Bake 10-15 minutes, until fork-tender but not mushy. Set aside to cool, and turn the oven off for now. Once cooled, you can throw the cooked apple in a small container until later.

I actually did a tiny bit smaller and cooked a bit further second time around, but didn’t manage to get a picture of it. You’ll see it later on, dumped on the dough.

In a large bowl, combine both flours, the salt, yeast, and water in a large bowl. Stir together until mostly combined, then knead just until all the remaining loose dry flour has been incorporated. Cover with plastic wrap, and place the bowl in a warm place (your oven with the light on is a good choice). Let rise at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Grease a large dutch oven well – can’t hurt to do the inside of the lid as well.

Turn your risen dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Flatten as much as you can just by patting flat by hand, without using a rolling pin.

Spread the baked apple pieces and the caramel chips over the dough, leaving a clear space around the edge.

You can see little apple bits here somewhat, they’re quite small, and cooked until lightly caramelized.

Pinch the edges of the dough together, creating a large log. Curl the log into a spiral and press it together. Gently transfer the spiral of dough into the greased dutch oven and press down gently on the surface to press it together a bit more. Put the lid on the dutch oven, then place back in the oven with the light on to rise an additional 2 hours.

After the 2 hour rise, turn your oven, with the dough still in it, to 425 degrees. Bake 40-45 minutes, then take the lid off your dutch oven and cook an additional 10-15 minutes, until it’s a nice brown.

Turn the bread out onto a wire rack to cool completely, then store in an airtight container.

Thanks to MaryKate for the french toast suggestion!

Caramel Apple Bread

Adapted from King Arthur Flour.

  • 1 1/2 cups apple, chopped small
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 1/4 cupsĀ bread flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour or white whole wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups cool water
  • 3/4 cup salted caramel chips

The night before (or early morning, depending on how you want to time this), preheat your oven to 425 degrees while you cut your apple.

Combine the cinnamon and sugar in a small bowl, then toss the apples in the mixture. Grease a baking sheet and spread the cinnamon sugar apple pieces on it. Bake 10-15 minutes, until fork-tender but not mushy. Set aside to cool, and turn the oven off for now. Once cooled, you can throw the cooked apple in a small container until later.

In a large bowl, combine both flours, the salt, yeast, and water in a large bowl. Stir together until mostly combined, then knead just until all the remaining loose dry flour has been incorporated. Cover with plastic wrap, and place the bowl in your oven with the oven light on. Let rise at least 8 hours, or overnight.

Grease a large dutch oven well – can’t hurt to do the inside of the lid as well.

Turn your risen dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Flatten as much as you can just by patting flat by hand, without using a rolling pin. Spread the baked apple pieces and the caramel chips over the dough, leaving a clear space around the edge. Pinch the edges of the dough together, creating a large log. Curl the log into a spiral and press it together. Gently transfer the spiral of dough into the greased dutch oven and press down gently on the surface to press it together a bit more. Put the lid on the dutch oven, then place back in the oven with the light on to rise an additional 2 hours.

After the 2 hour rise, turn your oven, with the dough still in it, to 425 degrees. Bake 40-45 minutes, then take the lid off your dutch oven and cook an additional 10-15 minutes, until it’s a nice brown. Turn the bread out onto a wire rack to cool completely, then store in an airtight container.

 

 

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And the (kitchen?) crowd goes mild…

Y’ever have things just fail to go right? For ages? Well, here’s what’s been going on/going wrong in my kitchen the last few weeks, and why I’ve got nothing much to share until next week.

If you’ve ever noticed, any recipe you’ll ever find for caramel cake is actually vanilla or yellow cake, with caramel frosting. No one ever makes a caramel flavored cake! I thought maybe I’d found the solution in this way to caramelize sugar without melting it. After 5 hours of baking the sugar, it had a caramel-y smell, and a noticeable caramel flavor, so I was sure I was golden.

I put the sugar in a yellow cake and paired my hopefully-caramel cake with chocolate cream cheese frosting. Couple hours of making/baking/cooling later, and I had…a cake that’s entirely fine but in no way caramel. Disappointing.

After that, I thought maybe using the sugar in sugar cookies, and specifically ones that get rolled in sugar, would get the flavor right out there on your tongue and be unavoidable. Well, consider it avoided. The cookies have no noticeable caramel flavor. This used up the rest of the sugar I’d spent 5 hours baking, and I don’t hugely recommend the experiment to anyone else.

In the last week I also made this squash/chickpea/pasta dish that I enjoyed, but not enough to probably ever bother making again, and considering I’ve already made the stir-fried gochujang dish again… eh this doesn’t rate its own post.

Finally, I made a huge, overnight apple bread that totally is worth sharing, but only once I’ve changed the recipe enough to reflect how it actually works, and gotten pictures to match how I think it’ll work better. I’ve got the first loaf of bread the size of my head to get through before I start the improvement, so… that’s what-all has been going on in my kitchen lately. Hope more noteworthy things have been developing in all of yours!

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