Japchae Hotteok

These would probably take several tries to get perfect looking, and I’m all out of the right noodles so that isn’t happening right now, but they’re VERY DELICIOUS so I’m going to share and we can all slowly perfect our japchae pancake making together over time!

Ingredients:

Dough:

  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 teaspoons neutral tasting oil (=veg, canola, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted and cooled to room temp
  • 2 1/2 cups (300 grams) bread flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • additional oil for frying

Filling:

  • 3 ounces dangmyeon noodles (Korean sweet potato noodles – Amazon has them if you don’t have a local Asian market)
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon mirin (if you don’t have mirin, use rice vinegar and an extra pinch of sugar)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/4 yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1 ounce carrot, finely chopped (I just bought shredded carrots, I needed most of the bag for something else anyway)
  • 1 ounce finely chopped chives
  • 2 green onions finely sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

To make the dough, combine the water, yeast, milk, and sugar in a small container and stir together. Set aside ~10 minutes until foamy, then add the oil and butter. (I only almost forgot the fats!)

Meanwhile, combine the flour and salt in a large bowl and whisk together.

When the yeast mixture is ready, slowly pour it in while stirring with a rubber spatula, then keep stirring another 5 minutes until very smooth. Cover, and let rise ~45 minutes until doubled. (As usual, an oven with just the light on is a good, slightly toasty place for letting dough rise, as long as you don’t accidentally preheat the oven with your bowl still in it!)

While the dough rises, prepare the filling. First, cook the noodles according to the package instructions. Remove them from the water when cooked, put in a medium bowl, and toss with the sesame oil.

Either while the noodles cook or after, make their sauce by combining the soy sauce, oyster sauce, sugar, and mirin in a small dish and stirring together.

Place a medium skillet over medium-low heat and heat the tablespoon of vegetable oil. Add the noodles and sauce and cook, stirring, until most of the liquid has evaporated.

Transfer the sauced noodles back to their bowl. Cut the noodles into short pieces using kitchen shears. Add the onion, carrot, chives, green onion, and pepper, and stir to combine. At this point, you’ve made quite tasty japchae, and you’ve got enough to spare a few bites to try.

When the dough is doubled, prepare your workspace.

You’re going to be shaping little ball/blob/pancakes, and you’ll need a greased surface (like a plate/cookie sheet sprayed with baking spray) to put them on until they’re ready to go into the pan. You’ll also need a large nonstick skillet with enough oil in it to cover the bottom, heated to medium. Additionally, you’ll need cooling racks or paper towels for the cooked pancakes to wind up on. Finally, you’ll need a spatula!

Grease your hands and grab 2 – 2 1/2 ounce portions of the dough. Flatten it out into a circle in your hand and put 1 tablespoon of filling into the center. Gently draw the sides of the dough up to seal them together into one ball. This dough seemed way too gloopy for that to be possible at first glance, but it did end up working!

Shape the filled balls of dough, then put 2-3 in the waiting skillet – you’re going to flatten them later, so even if it looks now like you have room for more, that may be risky! Cook for 2-3 minutes, until golden brown, then flip. Flatten, by pressing down with the spatula, until about 3/4″ thick, and cook an additional 2-3 minutes until golden on the other side. Remove cooked pancakes to your racks/paper towels, and repeat with the remaining balls.

While eating these hot, straight from the stove is ideal, they actually held up well for several days. Leftovers are better if either toasted back up on the stove, or in a toaster oven.

Realistically, your kitchen is going to be a bit of a mess, but it’s totally worth it!

Japchae Hotteok

From Simply Korean.

Dough:

  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 teaspoons neutral tasting oil (=veg, canola, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted and cooled to room temp
  • 2 1/2 cups (300 grams) bread flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • additional oil for frying

Filling:

  • 3 ounces dangmyeon noodles (Korean sweet potato noodles – Amazon has them if you don’t have a local Asian market)
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon mirin (if you don’t have mirin, use rice vinegar and an extra pinch of sugar)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/4 yellow onion, finely diced
  • 1 ounce carrot, finely chopped
  • 1 ounce finely chopped chives
  • 2 green onions finely sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

To make the dough, combine the water, yeast, milk, and sugar in a small container and stir together. Set aside ~10 minutes until foamy, then add the oil and butter.

Meanwhile, combine the flour and salt in a large bowl and whisk together. When the yeast mixture is ready, slowly pour it in while stirring with a rubber spatula, then keep stirring another 5 minutes until very smooth. Cover, and let rise ~45 minutes until doubled.

While the dough rises, prepare the filling. First, cook the noodles according to the package instructions. Remove them from the water when cooked, put in a medium bowl, and toss with the sesame oil.

Either while the noodles cook or after, make their sauce by combining the soy sauce, oyster sauce, sugar, and mirin in a small dish and stirring together.

Place a medium skillet over medium-low heat and heat the tablespoon of vegetable oil. Add the noodles and sauce and cook, stirring, until most of the liquid has evaporated. Transfer the sauced noodles back to their bowl. Cut the noodles into short pieces using kitchen shears. Add the onion, carrot, chives, green onion, and pepper, and stir to combine. At this point, you’ve made quite tasty japchae, and you’ve got enough to spare a few bites to try.

When the dough is doubled, prepare your workspace. You’re going to be shaping little ball/blob/pancakes, and you’ll need a greased surface (like a plate/cookie sheet sprayed with baking spray) to put them on until they’re ready to go into the pan. You’ll also need a large nonstick skillet with enough oil in it to cover the bottom, heated to medium. Additionally, you’ll need cooling racks or paper towels for the cooked pancakes to wind up on. Finally, you’ll need a spatula!

Grease your hands and grab 2 – 2 1/2 ounce portions of the dough. Flatten it out into a circle in your hand and put 1 tablespoon of filling into the center. Gently draw the sides of the dough up to seal them together into one ball.

Shape the filled balls of dough, then put 2 in the waiting skillet – you’re going to flatten them later, so even if it looks now like you have room for more, that may be risky! Cook for 2-3 minutes, until golden brown, then flip. Flatten, by pressing down with the spatula, until about 3/4″ thick, and cook an additional 2-3 minutes until golden on the other side. Remove cooked pancakes to your racks/paper towels, and repeat with the remaining balls.

While eating these hot, straight from the stove is ideal, they actually held up well for several days. Leftovers are better if either toasted back up on the stove, or in a toaster oven.

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About sparecake

My name's Corinne, and I like cake, cookies, and chocolate! Also, non-c-things such as ponies, Star Trek, and biking. I write a food blog and a blog about life, wide open spaces, and museum work. Nice to meet you!
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