Cider-Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Fall is here (heck by the time this post goes up it’ll probably have snowed where I live), which for me means putting apples everywhere I can. I did a couple cider recipes in a row recently to justify buying a whole gallon, and this one was most emphatically a winner. It’s tangy and sweet and just delightful! I ate it with this cider-squash recipe, which is… the best I’ve liked butternut squash, but still not AMAZING so I’m not going to be giving it its own post here. But back to the pork! –

img_7705Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup apple cider
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 (1–1 1/2 pound) pork tenderloin
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Whisk together the cider, cider vinegar, and mustard in a small bowl. Set aside.

img_7694Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Trim any excess fat or creepy bits (tendons) from the pork, then pat the outside dry with paper towels. Sprinkle salt, pepper, and the rosemary evenly all over the pork.

Heat the butter and oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium high heat. Add the pork and sear until the bottom gets a golden-brown crust. It should already smell really good at this point!

img_7698Turn the pork, using tongs, and sear similarly on all the other sides.

img_7699Transfer the pan to the oven and cook until an instant read thermometer reads 140 degrees in the center, 12-15 minutes. If you have one of the ones that reads the meat while it’s still in the oven, even better, mine was even hotter at just 12 minutes. Remove the pork to a clean plate/cutting board.

img_7701Return the pan to medium high heat and add the cider mixture, scraping up the browned bits on the bottom with a wooden spoon.

img_7702When the cider has reached a simmer, return the pork to the pan. Spoon the cider mixture over the pork, tilting the pan as needed to scoop up more mixture.

img_7703Continue spooning the cider mixture until it reduces and thickens. Remove the pan from the heat, and remove the pork to a cutting board. Tent with foil and let rest 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving, drizzling with the remaining cider sauce.

I should learn how to sharpen a knife some day.

I should learn how to sharpen a knife some day.

img_7708

Yum!

Cider-Glazed Pork Tenderloin

From Delish.com.

  • 1/2 cup apple cider
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 (1–1 1/2 pound) pork tenderloin
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Whisk together the cider, cider vinegar, and mustard in a small bowl. Set aside.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Trim any excess fat or tendons from the pork, then pat it dry with paper towels. Sprinkle salt, pepper, and the rosemary evenly all over the pork.

Heat the butter and oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium high heat. Add the pork and sear until the bottom gets a golden-brown crust. Turn the pork, using tongs, and sear similarly on all the other sides. Transfer the pan to the oven and cook until an instant read thermometer reads 140 degrees in the center, 12-15 minutes. Remove the pork to a clean plate.

Return the pan to medium high heat and add the cider mixture, scraping up the browned bits on the bottom with a wooden spoon. When the cider has reached a simmer, return the pork to the pan. Spoon the cider mixture over the pork, tilting the pan as needed to scoop up more mixture. Continue spooning the cider mixture until it reduces and thickens. Remove the pan from the heat, and remove the pork to a cutting board. Tent with foil and let rest 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving, drizzling with the remaining cider sauce.

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About sparecake

My name's Corinne, and I like cake, cookies, and chocolate! Also, non-c-things such as ponies, Star Trek, and biking. I write a food blog and a blog about life, wide open spaces, and museum work. Nice to meet you!
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