Rye Raisin Bread

A flavorful bread, the raisins are sweet but the molasses in the dough just adds flavor, not additional sweetness. It was nice!

Ingredients:

Sponge:

  • 2 cups rye flour
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water (120-130 degrees)

Dough:

  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup light (sultana) raisins
  • 1/2 cup water or brandy
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup warm water (105-115 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 cups rye flour
  • 1 1/2 cups bread or all-purpose flour (I used bread flour)
  • 1 egg + 1 teaspoon milk beaten together for egg wash

In a large bowl, combine the flour and yeast for the sponge, then pour in the hot water and stir until evenly mixed. Cover and let sit at room temperature until bubbly, at least 2-3 hours, or up to 3 days for a stronger rye flavor.

Towards the end of that time, combine the raisins and 1/2 cup water or brandy for 1/2 an hour, then drain, toss the liquid into the sponge, and pat the raisins dry.

In a small bowl, stir together the molasses, oil, salt, and warm water.

Add to the sponge, then add the raisins as well, and stir to combine. Add the rye and bread flours, alternating half cups, and stir with a wooden spoon, then by hand, adding additional flour if the mixture is still quite sticky.

Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Place the kneaded dough in a large bowl and grease the surface. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Punch down the risen dough and divide into 2 pieces.

Let rest 5 minutes, then shape into round loaves, slightly flattened, and place the loaves on a greased on lined baking sheet. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees.

After rising, brush the surface of both loaves with the egg wash.

Bake 1 hour, or until well browned and crusty, and tapping the bottom gives a hollow sound.

Rye Raisin Bread

From Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads (which gives more options for how to put the dough together, if you’re into using a mixer or a food processor).

Sponge:

  • 2 cups rye flour
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups hot water (120-130 degrees)

Dough:

  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/2 cup light (sultana) raisins
  • 1/2 cup water or brandy
  • 1 tablespoon molasses
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 cup warm water (105-115 degrees)
  • 1 1/2 cups rye flour
  • 1 1/2 cups bread or all-purpose flour (I used bread flour)
  • 1 egg + 1 teaspoon milk beaten together for egg wash

In a large bowl, combine the flour and yeast for the sponge, then pour in the hot water and stir until evenly mixed. Cover and let sit at room temperature until bubbly, at least 2-3 hours, or up to 3 days for a stronger rye flavor. Towards the end of that time, combine the raisins and 1/2 cup water or brandy for 1/2 an hour, then drain, toss the liquid into the sponge, and pat the raisins dry.

In a small bowl, stir together the molasses, oil, salt, and warm water. Add to the sponge, then add the raisins as well, and stir to combine. Add the rye and bread flours, alternating half cups, and stir with a wooden spoon, then by hand, adding additional flour if the mixture is still quite sticky. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Place the kneaded dough in a large bowl and grease the surface. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

Punch down the risen dough and divide into 2 pieces. Let rest 5 minutes, then shape into round loaves, slightly flattened, and place the loaves on a greased on lined baking sheet. Cover, and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees.

After rising, brush the surface of both loaves with the egg wash. Bake 1 hour, or until well browned and crusty, and tapping the bottom gives a hollow sound.

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About sparecake

My name's Corinne, and I like cake, cookies, and chocolate! Also, non-c-things such as ponies, Star Trek, and biking. I write a food blog and a blog about life, wide open spaces, and museum work. Nice to meet you!
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